An Open Letter to senator Bong Revilla

Dear senator Bong Revilla,

When your colleagues in the Senate, Senators Franklin Drillon and Ping Lacson, filed a resolution that would allow Sen. Leila’s participation in relevant Senate proceedings via video conference, you vehemently protested insisting that it would be tantamount to double standards, and a sense of entitlement on Sen. Leila’s part.

Sir, naman, magkaibang-magkaiba po ang sitwasyon ninyo ni Sen. De Lima.

Here, let me enlighten you why that is so.

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Firstly, we ALL know that Sen. De Lima is detained on trumped-up charges orchestrated by a vindictive tyrant with an ax to grind. Nothing more.

Not an ounce of illegal drug was found in her possession, not a trail of the purported drug money was established, and not a single witness of unquestionable reputation and motive was presented. Kaya nga, hanggang ngayon ay hindi pa rin umuusad ang mga kaso laban sa kanya. Imagine, six judges na ang nag-withdraw from hearing her cases!

You, on the other hand, was indicted with a plunder charge and 16 counts of graft for funneling your pork barrel through the bogus NGOs of PDAF Scam Queen Janet Lim Napoles. All the amounts mentioned by Benhur Luy during the hearings and recorded in his ledger matched the amounts that went into the bank accounts of your family. Kaya nga, nakakapagtaka when you were acquitted of plunder last December. But more perplexing is the fact that, along with that acquittal, is the order for you to return your loot to the tune of P124,500 million!

Ikaw ba, hindi rin nagtaka at naguluhan kagaya naming lahat, Sir?

Secondly, you said that the Senate leadership at the time of your detention believed that your absence “would have no impact on legislation.” Malamang nga po, Sir, hindi kayo masyadong kawalan –unlike Sen. De Lima, who is a brilliant lawyer and a diligent member of the Senate. In fact, even in detention, tuloy-tuloy pa rin ang pagtatrabaho ng butihing Senadora through her extremely competent staff.

Ikaw po, bukod sa pagsi-selfie mo dati sa loob ng Crame, anong kapaki-pakinabang na bagay ang nagawa mo while incarcerated?

Thirdly, in Sen. De Lima’s case, she has colleagues who actually filed a resolution in her behalf. Sa inyo, wala e. Wala yata talaga kayong kasama sa Senado na bilib sa kakayahan nyo.

Mag-budots na lang kaya kayo, Sir?

That’s all for now, senator Revilla. Goodluck to you!

 

Naglilinaw lang po,

Ang Taumbayan

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A PRESIDENT’S POTTY MOUTH

Today marks the Duterte administration’s 100th day since he assumed office on June 30. What’s the best way to observe this milestone, you ask? By reminding ourselves of the President’s trademark gutter mouth, that’s what!

The following is a list of Pres. Duterte’s statements that left the world in shock, and the Filipinos either cringing in shame or cheering shamelessly.

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Image grabbed from the net.

On God:

I can teach God about justice.

When a one-year-old baby, 18-month-old baby is taken from the mother’s arms, brought under a jeep and raped and killed, where is God? And in Syria, women and children, who don’t want to have sex with Isis [Islamic State], they are burned. So where’s God? My God, where are you?

On the Catholic Church:

There are things which the Catholic Church must change or else, it will — by the end of these three decades from now, it becomes irrelevant.

I once considered being a priest. It’s good (that) I didn’t join the priesthood or else, now, I would be a homosexual.

To/On US and/or Pres. Obama:

They say, the CIA is planning to kill me. Until now, I cannot believe that I am the [President]. Give me the chance to think [and realize that I am the] President.

Better think twice now because I would be asking you to leave the Philippines altogether.

The Americans, I don’t like them. They are reprimanding me in public. So I say: ‘Screw you, f*** you, everything else. You are stupid.

I do not want to quarrel with the most powerful country on the planet, but Washington has been so liberal about criticizing human rights, human rights and human rights. How about you? I have so many questions also about human rights to ask you. So … people who live in glass houses should not throw stones at others.

As you know, I’m fighting with (US Secretary of State John Kerry’s) ambassador. His gay ambassador, the son of a whore. He pissed me off.

You have a president, Netanyahu… he doesn’t care about America. Do they ever chastise Netanyahu? No. (on likening himself to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu over how they both defy the influence of the United States on the two countries)

I would not cut our umbilical cord to countries we are allied with.

I do not want a rift with America, but they have to go. It’ll become more heated. If they (the ASG members) see an American, the latter will really be killed. Ransomed off, then killed.

Instead of helping us, the first who attacked (the anti-drug campaign) was the State Department. So, you can go to hell. Mr. Obama, you can go to hell.

I am a president of a sovereign state and we have long ceased to be a colony. I do not have any master except the Filipino people, nobody but nobody. You must be respectful. Do not just throw away questions and statements. (in Filipino) Son of a whore, I will curse you in that forum.

I purposely did not attend the bilateral talks between ASEAN countries and the president of the US. The reason is that I do not like the Americans. It’s simply a matter of principle for me.

Eventually in my time, I would break up with America. I would rather go to Russia or to China. Even though we don’t agree with the ideology, they have respect for the people.

We will be wallowing in the mud if you do that to me. (to US Pres. Obama)

Itong EDCA, it is an official document but it’s only signed by an aide and si Gazmin. It does not bear the signature of the President of the Republic of the Philippines, Aquino. Better think twice now because I would be asking you to leave the Philippines altogether.

United States failed as a friend to the Philippines.

There are others who have the mental capacity of dogs who lap at the ass of the Americans.

I got really angry about these threats over this human rights issue. This is the fault of the crazy people in the State Department.

If you think it’s high time for you guys to withdraw your assistance, go ahead. We will not beg for it. Go away. Bring your money to somewhere else. (addressed to the US, EU and UN)

To the European Union:

These stupid lawyers in the EU… well, screw you. I will kick you.

(You can go to hell, Mr. Obama.) The EU, better choose purgatory. Hell is filled up. (over criticisms of his deadly anti-drug war)

I have read the condemnation of the European Union against me. I’m telling them, ‘F**k you. You’re doing it in atonement for your sins.

To the United Nations:

I don’t give a sh*t. I am the president of the Philippines, not the republic of the international community.

I am inviting the United Nations’ Ban Ki … what’s the name of that devil? … Ban Ki-moon… to come to the Philippines.

(I encourage her to) come to the Philippines and count the numbers of deaths also incurred by government with [her] fingers to guide her how many deaths were cost. (to Agnes Callamard, UN special rapporteur for summary executions)

Pati ito si Ban Ki-moon, nakihalo. He also gave his statement before, several weeks ago, about the human rights violation. Sabi ko, isa ka pang tarantado (I said, you’re one more fool).

Maybe we’ll just have to decide to separate from the United Nations. (in Filipino) If you are that insulting, son of a bitch, we should just leave. Take us out of your organization. You have done nothing anyway.

To the International Critics:

Every time you insult the Philippines or you reprimand or castigate me in public, you are really crucifying the Filipino people.

Tomorrow, I will be friends with (Russian President Vladimir) Putin and (Chinese President) Xi Jinping.

To China:

The Chinese people this time might find a place in their hearts for the Filipinos. After all, I come from— there’s a Chinese blood in me, so I hope that you treat us your brothers, not your enemies and take note of the plight of our citizens. (to Chinese Ambassador to the Philippines Zhao Jianhua)

On the War Against Drugs:

There are 6,000 barangay captains doing their own thing, manufacturing shabu. How am I supposed to deal with – sometimes I am tempted really to declare martial law.

Rehabilitation is no longer a viable option (for shabu addicts).

Do your duty, and if in the process, you kill 1,000 persons because you were doing your duty, I will protect you. (to police officers)

What I can assure you is, for as long as I’m president, you will have all equipment and weaponry necessary to win the war or at least to defeat them in every fight. (to Filipino soldiers)

I have started this; I will end this. I don’t mind landing in jail as long as you visit me in Muntinlupa. Bring drugs so I can be addicted to them. (on his war against illegal drugs)

You do not have to worry about the criminal liability. I will go to prison for you. Just do it according to the book. If you are pressed down, then do not worry. Just call my name and I will be there to protect you. (to the police and military officers)

If you know of any addicts, go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful. (to the crowd)

There will be no let-up in this campaign. We will not stop until the last drug lord, the last financier and the last pusher has surrendered or been put behind bars or below the ground if they so wish.

I ordered the validation. I am the one reading it and I am the sole person responsible for this one. (on the narco list)

I am telling you, do not go on the other side. Otherwise, you will be first in the [kill]list. (to the police and military officers)

Crime against humanity? In the first place, I’d like to be frank with you: are they humans? What is your definition of a human being? Human rights? Use it properly in the right context if you have the brains. You cannot wage a war without killing.

If you are involved in drugs, I will kill you. You son of a whore, I will really kill you.

I will pay, for a drug lord: 5M pesos if he is dead. If he is alive, only 4.999 million.

If they are there in your neighborhood, feel free to call us, the police or do it yourself if you have the gun. You have my support. If he fights and fights to the death, you can kill him. I will give you a medal.

We are 104M. You care about –how many—1,600 being killed.

It’s not the work of police to be wrapping people with plastic and (putting) him in the bag. That is not the job of the police. I just told (them) that one bullet will do. Why do you have to wrap it? I said, don’t waste your time.

I am ordering the sequestering of this property. Chua can never get it back again, I can assure you. Pag bumalik sya dito, sabi ko, sya nalang ang lutuin dyan sa loob. [If he goes back, he’ll be the one who’s going to be cooked there inside.] If you pour muriatic acid, you will never know where he is. (referring to a shabu laboratory in Pampanga)

I will not relent on this because they will do everything to make us, me, kneel down. ‘Di ako papayag. Alam nila ang problema. [I will never agree to it. They know the problem.]

On Extrajudicial Killings and Human Rights Violations:

My order is shoot to kill. I don’t care about human rights. Believe me, I don’t give a s**t about what they will say.

Do not listen to human rights’ [advocates] because [an advocate of the] human rights is antithesis of government.

You are all hypocrites! You cannot even protect the human rights in your own country, (of) the African-Americans and other minorities, not to mention your inutility in dealing with the genocide going on in Africa and other countries. (to New York-based Human Rights Watch)

Our justice system is dysfunctional. They have to shape up before we can really follow due process.

There is no law which says I cannot threaten criminals.

To Abu Sayyaf and other Terrorists:

I will really open up your body. Just give me vinegar and salt, and I will eat you.

Go ahead. Set off bombs. Time will come when I will eat you in front of the people. I will devour you. (after the Davao bombing)

There will be more, because of retaliation, reprisals, and there will be maybe more blasts. But, there will be a day of reckoning. Bantayan ninyo.

All of us want peace, not the peace of the dead, but the peace of the living. We express our willingness and readiness to go to the negotiating table, and yet we load our guns, fix our sights, pull the trigger. It is both ironic and tragic, and it is endless. (to our Muslim brothers)

To the CPP/NPA/NDF:

Let us end these decades of ambuscades and skirmishes. We are going nowhere and it is getting bloodier by the day.

I am announcing a unilateral ceasefire with the CPP-NPA-NDF effective immediately. I expect and call on our fellow Filipinos and the National Democratic Front and its forces to respond accordingly.

On Sen. Leila De Lima:

Every time I watch the video, I lose my appetite. Only people who will fall for her are … I am not a guard or a motorcycle cop or convict. (referring to Sen. De Lima’s alleged sexual escapades)

Akala niya, siya ang conscience of the country… P—– i– mo, hanggang ngayon naghihintay ako niyan… I kept quiet because you are a lady.

I have a special ano kay ano. She is a government official. One day soon I will – bitiwan ko yan (I will drop her) in public and I will have to destroy her in public.

If you remember, I was the only whipping boy niya. Human rights siya noon, she was starting to castigate, crucify me.

To Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno

Do not create a crisis because I will order everybody in the executive department not to honor you.

Would you rather I declare Martial Law?

To the Media:

I will not respond to questions anymore ever until the end of my term.

They said I am the most unpopular among the international press. I don’t care.

Stop threatening foreign and local media — even when they come up with unfavorable or critical write-ups. (to supporters)

I’m urging you; make this trip your last in Davao City. I do not care if no one is covering me. Do not threaten me. I said I’m ready to lose the presidency, my honor or my life. Just do not fuck with me.

You insult me internationally, fine, do it… You know, men judge best when they condemn. The translation of son of a b****, p**** ina mo… But they changed the nomenclature – ‘son of a whore,’ which is really not good to hear.

Nagpapapansin ka talaga sa akin (You’re really trying to catch my attention). (then made a wolf whistle to GMA-7 reporter Mariz Umali)

Corrupt journalists are legitimate targets of assassination.

If you are an upright journalist, nothing will happen to you. The example here is Pala. I do not want to diminish his memory but he was a rotten son of a bitch. He deserved it.

On Hitler:

I have been portrayed to be a cousin of Hitler. He massacred three million Jews. Now there are 3 million drug addicts (in the Philippines). I’d be happy to slaughter them. At least, if Germany had Hitler, the Philippines would have (me).

On the Issue of the PDAF Scam:

In between, far and wide in this controversy, I will now raise again the Napoles issue. It deserves a second look.

On the Paris Climate Agreement:

We have not reached the age of industrialization. We are going into it. But you (the industrialized countries) are trying to (cite) agreement that will impose limitations on us. We maintain the present emission. That’s stupid. I will not honor that. If you have qualms, pay us or give us time to catch up.

On Ferdinand Marcos:

My father was one of the Cabinet members of Marcos. That is why I cannot disassociate.

To the Jewish Community:

My wife is a Zimmerman. She is a descendant of an American Jew. Zimmerman. So why would I defile the memory of the Jews? What would I get if I insult the Jewish people when we have been friends and even in the matters of, I said, arms.

On Jane Veloso:

To beg for (Jane) Veloso’s life amid Philippine drug war leaves bad taste in the mouth.

On Federalism:

I can commit today to the Republic of the Philippines that if you will hurry up the federal system of government and you can submit it to the Filipino people by the fourth or fifth year, you call for a referendum, and after that, call for a presidential election.

On Death Penalty:

Every president along the way didn’t impose it only because the Catholic Church and all the bleeding hearts would say that only God could kill. But what if there is no God?

On Contractualization:

Let me warn again. You guys in the business sector, I do not want to quarrel with you, I will protect you. I said there will be no more shake downs in the Customs and in the BIR. I’m warning you again, but with all the protection that this government is giving you, if you continue with contractualization, there will, indeed, be some misunderstanding between us.

On Corruption in Government:

On Monday, I will declare all positions in the government — because of the presidential appointments — I will declare all your positions all throughout the country, vacant. You know why? I still hear corruption being committed by people especially in the regulatory agencies.

On his apologies:

I would like to apologize to you publicly. And I would say now, I am very sorry. Somehow, we were negligent in counter-checking during the first report. (to Rep. Amado Espino)

I would like to make it clear, here and now, that there was never any intention on my part to derogate the memory of the six million Jews murdered by the Germans. (to the Jewish community)

Dutertism:

Dito na lang kayo sa bago, Iglesia ni Duterte. Maganda dito, walang bawal.

I am a peaceful man now after the ASEAN.

I have learned a lot during my prosecution days. We planted evidence. We arrested persons but we released them, [then] telling him that it was this person who squealed on him. And then when he goes out for the killing, then we said that it was this fellow who really did it, who did you in.

When somebody called me [and told me about Sara’s miscarriage], I went to bathroom because I was at the lobby. I cried. These are the things in life that you cannot deal by just [ignoring it]. You have to heal yourself.

Election come and go, as we all know, and this would be my last fling with public service. I am old and, after this, I am going to retire.

In this quest, I will put at stake my honor, my life and the presidency itself.

On his Big Mouth:

The issue here is not my mouth. And they would say the ratings on business, on the economy, so be it, you get out of here. Then, we will start on our own. I can go to China, I can go to Russia. I had a talk with them, they are waiting for me, so what the hell. (when U.S.-based firm Standard & Poor warned that it may lower its investment-grade rating for the Phils. if reforms stall)

I can be foulmouthed but when I make a mistake, I can say I am very sorry.

For every profanity, there’s a story behind it. People should go beyond my cussing.

And you say that my mouth is not for a statesman, whoever told you I was applying for a statesman?

No, I will not stop, I will lose the momentum. And I cannot afford it because I am the President. The momentum has to be there and it will be there for six years until the last pusher is taken out of the streets. I cannot just play silent. (on Sen. Gordon’s suggestion to stop talking)

Never mind my mouth. I never aspired to be a statesman.

President Duterte might be a leader with big balls who will try anything in order to get the job done. Unfortunately, he has a bigger mouth that does not know how and when to shut up. As the man holding the highest position in the land, he is expected to adhere to some kind of proper decorum and presidential protocol. So for the country’s sake, let us all hope that our president will learn (asap!) how to wash his mouth —or how to zip it altogether!

LENI ROBREDO, THE LAST (WO)MAN STANDING (An Open Letter for Congresswoman Leni)

Dear Madam Leni,

You are the only woman Vice-Presidential candidate, but that is not what sets you apart from the others aspiring for the same position.

What makes you stand out is your unique brand of tsinelas leadership.

Some people would ask,” Ano po ba ang tsinelas leadership?”

A legacy of your late husband, tsinelas leadership encapsulates your qualities of connecting with the poor and marginalized whom you serve, of keeping your close ties with the masses, and of breaking barriers through accessibility. It is the readiness to get your feet wet and dirty in doing your job. It stands for good governance and genuine public service.

It is the leadership quality that is conspicuously lacking in most of our government officials and politicians today.

While members of Congress are known for their opulent lifestyles, ostentatious display of wealth and power, and patent style of grandstanding, you have managed to stay simple, humble, unassuming and practical.

You take the public bus in going to and from Naga every week, you constantly visit your constituents, you live in the same apartment unit where you and Sec. Jesse started your family, you bring your youngest daughter to school each morning before you go to work, you do your own grocery, and you shun the limelight (you were even caught using the backdoor entrance of the Batasan plenary hall to avoid the SONA red carpet).

In an interview, you said that simplicity is a commitment for your family so you will “remain rooted and avoid getting tempted and becoming used to the perks and privileges that come with the job”.

If only all our politicians could be like you, Ma’am, corruption would now be a thing of the past.

But that’s just it.

You are not a politician.

You are a public servant.

Even before you were thrust into the chaotic world of politics by the untimely demise of Sec. Jesse, you were already serving the people. For free. As an advocate lawyer, you were helping the farmers through your affiliation with Saligan, and the oppressed and the indigent sectors through the Public Attorney’s Office.

Being a staunch champion of women’s empowerment and gender equality, you helped establish and chaired the Naga City Council for Women to give women a voice in governance and decision-making. You also founded the Lakas ng Kababaihan ng Naga to provide training and livelihood opportunities for the women of your beloved hometown.

When you got elected in 2013 as the representative of the 3rd district of Camarines Sur, you were able to author or co-author a total of 14 laws and 121 bills.

Ma’am, that was quite a feat for any political novice!

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According to one brilliant lawmaker, Filipinos should choose their next leaders based on three standards — academic excellence, professional excellence and moral excellence.

Please join me, Ma’am, in evaluating your five VP opponents with reference to these standards.

Alan Peter Cayetano

A graduate of the Ateneo Law School, Cayetano entered politics at a young age. Hardworking and passionate, he is known to espouse worthy causes. He fearlessly exposes and relentlessly investigates government officials involved in illegal activities.

I have always been a Cayetano supporter even if he is a member of a political dynasty — that is, until he made Mayor Duterte his running mate.

I don’t understand why a public servant of Cayetano’s caliber, academic background and integrity would condone, and even defend, someone who is prone to making reckless, malicious and callous statements; someone who has allegations of extra-judicial killings and, recently, unexplained wealth under his belt; someone who can’t present concrete, admirable and plausible plans of action for the country; someone who can incite, and revels in, a mob reaction from his supporters; and someone whose lifestyle is an insult to the very values we hold dear as Filipinos. Why would Cayetano throw away his moral compass and his father’s legacy of good governance? Why would he turn a blind eye and a deaf ear to the glaring iniquities that he so dauntlessly fought against in the past?

I just don’t get it.

Francis “Chiz” Escudero

A graduate at the UP College of Law with a master’s degree in International and Comparative Law from the Georgetown University, Escudero impressed me with his dedication and intellect. In his eighteen years of public service (he served as Congressman from 1998-2007 and as Senator from 2007-present), he was able to file more than 500 bills and to pass 144 laws. I also admire the stance he assumed on certain issues (pro-impeachment charges against GMA, pro-RH bill, pro-FOI bill, pro-Corona impeachment, against divorce, against imposition of new taxes).

There are just three things that I take against the smooth-talking senator.

Firstly, he is in favor of a Marcos burial at the Libingan ng mga Bayani. But, then, I should have seen that coming. His father, after all, is the late Salvador Escudero III, a known Marcos crony.

Secondly, he is prone to support politicians of either questionable integrity or doubtful capability. Fernando Poe Jr., Joseph Estrada, Jejomar Binay — I have no idea what principle or guideline Escudero employs in choosing whom to give his loyalty to.

Thirdly, he is the second poorest senator but he was able to afford a lavish Balesin wedding (and another fancy reception in Manila) to actress Heart Evangelista. Escudero’s defence that they did not spend beyond their means only managed to rouse suspicion regarding two important points: the issues of propriety and conflict of interest. By the way, among their principal sponsors are Hans Sy (of the SM group of companies), Ramon Ang (of San Miguel Corporation), Fernando Zobel (of Ayala Corporation), Andrew Tan (of Megaworld Corporation), Lance Gokongwei (of Robinson’s Corporation, Cebu Pacific and JG Summit), Bobby Ongpin (of Alphaland), and Jerry Acuzar (of New San Jose Builders).

Quite impressive, huh?

Antonio “Sonny” Trillanes IV & Gregorio “Gringo” Honasan

Trillanes graduated cum laude in the Philippine Military Academy and later earned his master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of the Philippines. He is one of the most productive senators during the 15th and 16th Congress, with a total of 1,109 bills and resolutions filed, 56 of which have been passed into law.

Honasan, on the other hand, earned his Bachelor of Science degree, along with the academy’s highest leadership award, from the Philippine Military Academy. He was a highly decorated soldier and was one of the principal players in the 1986 EDSA revolution that toppled the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos.  As a Senator, Honasan’s primary advocacies include environmental, military, police, and agrarian reform issues.

Trillanes led the 2003 Oakwood mutiny and the 2007 Manila Peninsula siege as a protest against the prevalence of social injustice and the rampant corruption during PGMA’s administration. Honasan, with the Reform the Armed Forces Movement (RAM) and allegedly under the tutelage of then Defense Sec. Enrile, staged a total of six coup attempts against the Cory administration. Two of these attempts became bloody – the Aug. 1987 coup left 53 dead while the Dec. 1989 coup left 99 dead (50 of which were civilians) and 570 wounded. He was also allegedly behind the Oakwood Mutiny and Feb 2006 coup attempt against PGMA.

While I understand their apparent discontent and resentment that compelled them to rebel against the government, they should have, in my opinion, upheld their constitutional mandate to enforce the law and to protect the people and the state. There are other ways — legal ways — to express one’s grievances, that could prove to be more effective and casualty-free. PGMA is now under hospital arrest, isn’t she?

Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr.

I tried, really hard, to find any redeeming quality that could somehow humanize in my eyes this dictator’s heir. But to no avail.

All I can see when I look at Bongbong is the face of a chronic liar.

He presents his father’s dictatorial rule (what he fondly calls the Golden Years) “as the best thing that ever happened to this country.” That statement is, of course, in stark contrast with what the historians have to say, “The Marcos government appears, by any standard, exceptional for both the quantity and quality of its violence.” Under Martial Law, 70,000 were incarcerated; 35,000 were tortured; 882 went missing; and 3,257 were murdered.

In the comic booklet that Bongbong’s camp released late last year, he depicted his family as the clueless victims of the US soldiers who greeted them with guns when they landed in Hawaii in 1986. It is, again, in stark contrast with the personal accounts of the journalists who witnessed the Marcoses’s arrival at the Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii. According to them, the Marcos family “was greeted by high ranking US military officials and by the old friends of the ex-president and Madam Imelda, Hawaii’s governor and his wife, who both placed leis around their necks.

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Bongbong claims that it is the government that is blocking the compensation of Martial Law victims. Debunking that, the PCGG said that “court records would show that it was the senator who was hindering the return of his family’s ill-gotten funds to the people”.

He maintains that he has never been accused of abuse of power during his father’s presidency. However, “in 1985, when he was 26 years old, his father appointed him chairman of the board of the Philippine Communications Satellite Corporation (Philcomsat), receiving a monthly salary of around US$9,700. This, despite that fact that he rarely went to the Philcomsat office. In 1986, government auditors discovered that Philcomsat was one of the many corporations and organizations used to siphon ill-gotten wealth out of the country.”

Bongbong has been arrogantly proclaiming that his father’s wealth came from legitimate sources. “In 2003, however, the Supreme Court defined the ill-gotten wealth of the Marcos family as those in excess of their total legal income of around $304,000 only, earned from 1965 to 1986. So far, PCGG has managed to recover about $4 billion, less than half of the $10-billion fortune believed to have been amassed by the Marcoses through the years.

He also lied about his academic credentials by claiming to have an undergraduate degree at Oxford University, one of the world’s most prestigious and elite universities. However, Oxford confirmed that Bongbong definitely did not earn such degree. In his official resume’, he also claimed to have earned an MBA from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Wharton School records do not show any Marcos Jr. in their list of graduates.

Bongbong is emphatic in saying that he has never been implicated in anomalies involving corruption during all these years of his public service. He, however, figured in whistleblower Benhur Luy’s list of lawmakers involved in the multi-billion scam. P205 million of his PDAF is allegedly allocated to the six fake NGOs owned by Napoles. Wow, that’s a lot of money!

Lastly, he said that, “The sins of the father are not the sins of the son…..It is not my obligation to apologize for the sins of the past administrations.” But he and his entire family have been, for decades now, enjoying the fruits of those sins. His election funds may very well be coming from the legendary Marcos plunder. And, for goodness’ sake, he is just a heartbeat away from Malacanang should he win this coming election!

So, please, Congresswoman Leni. Do not let the dictator’s son win.

Do not let another Marcos rule the country.

Do not let Bongbong Marcos make fools of the Filipinos for the second time.

Rest assured that we, the enlightened and vigilant people of this country, are with you in this endeavor. You won’t be alone.

Now, let me end this letter with the words I shared in the Women For Leni page.

“Like every Filipino, I wish for a better Philippines.

I want to leave my children and my children’s children with a country that is lovingly steered by public servants with unquestionable integrity, uncompromising principles, stellar work ethics, fervent compassion for the underprivileged, and genuine concern for our beloved Luzviminda.

Leni, for me, is the embodiment of all that. And more.

Modest and unassuming, she hates to be in the limelight. She is a reluctant leader who was forced to dip her finger in the dirty waters of politics due to her passion to serve the people. She is a woman of action who does not hesitate to have her hands dirty in reaching out to the needy. She has a name that is untarnished by corruption and is synonymous with “tsinelas leadership.” She is the epitome of an empowered Filipina, the voice of the voiceless, the champion of the oppressed.

My conscience would never let me vote for anyone else.”

Respectfully yours,

Lorelei B. Aquino (Mom On A Mission)

 

Note: For a complete list of Leni Robredo’s accomplishments, click here.